Have questions about how it all works?

We are happy to answer them. We've put together a list of some of our most common questions and their answers. If you cannot find the answer that you are looking for, please reach out to a member of our team.


Is Healthy MOMS an inpatient rehab program?

No, Healthy MOMS is not an inpatient rehab program. Our team is based in Lackawanna County, Pennsylvania and is positioned to serve over 300 patients throughout the region, regardless of ability to pay.


What if I am uninsured?

Healthy MOMS services are offered to patients no matter their insurance status or ability to pay. A sliding fee scale is available for those who qualify.


If I disclose an addiction to my doctor, will Children and Youth try to take my baby away?

No, our goal is to help pregnant women build healthy sustainable lives in recovery so that they are able to care for their baby. We want to help women give birth to healthy babies and we understand the importance of keeping families together whenever possible.


What does Medication Assisted Treatment (MAT) mean and what are the requirements of this program?

Medication Assisted Treatment is the use of medications in combination with counseling and behavioral health services to provide holistic patient-centered care for those facing addiction. MAT is a treatment option for people who have substance use disorders and is primarily used for the treatment of addiction to opioids such as heroin, prescription painkillers, stimulants, and alcohol. MAT can reduce cravings and withdrawal symptoms and allow the individual to focus on important lifestyle modifications that are key to recovery.


Can pregnant women be in an MAT program?

Yes, pregnant women can participate in the MAT program. Subutex is the medication used for pregnant women with substance use disorder. The overarching goals of therapy for substance use disorders during pregnancy are to provide medical support to prevent withdrawal during pregnancy, minimize fetal exposure to harmful substances, and empower the mother to become a leader in her recovery.

Such engagement provides the mother with the opportunity to receive medical and social support services which improve outcomes both during and after pregnancy.


Will I have to put my job or other family responsibilities on hold while I am in treatment?

No, you will not have to put your job or other family responsibilities on hold.  As part of our program, you are required to attend weekly check-ins with our team and see a physician on a biweekly basis.


Do I have to tell my partner or my family I'm in treatment?

No, you do not have to tell your partner or family that you are in treatment. Your treatment information is private; however, sustainable recovery takes work and a healthy support network is a very important piece of treatment.


What kind of support is offered after I deliver the baby?

The Healthy MOMS team is committed to your recovery and we will continue to support mothers after they deliver their babies. Mothers can continue to be part of Healthy MOMS MAT program, provided by The Wright Center for Community Health. In addition, our team will help mothers make follow up appointments and establish care for their babies with one of ourlocal doctors.


Will my baby need medication?

Treatment for babies born with Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome (NAS) is unique for each baby. Some babies may need medications to treat severe withdrawal symptoms and to help relieve the discomfort and problems of withdrawal. Sometimes babies will need extra fluids, given intravenously, to prevent dehydration or high caloric baby formula for babies who need extra calories to help them grow. Most babies with NAS who get treatment get better in 5 to 30 days.


Will my baby remain with me in the hospital?

We understand how important it is for mothers to bond with their babies after birth. All babies will remain with their mothers whenever possible; however, sometimes babies born to mothers with Opioid Use Disorder will need to spend time in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) for close monitoring and/or treatment.

Click here for more information.


What is Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome?

Neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) is a term used to describe a group of problems a baby experiences when withdrawing from exposure to drugs. Pregnant women who are using heroin, opioids (ex. prescription pain medications) and women undergoing MAT for opioid use disorders may give birth to babies born with NAS.

Common signs and symptoms of babies born with NAS include:

  • Irritability (excessive crying)
  • Sleep problems
  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Dehydration
  • Sweating
  • Fever or unstable temperature
  • Tremors or Seizures

Click here for more information on NAS.

Ready to learn more?

We know that the system isn't easy to navigate. Get in touch with one of team members for guidance.

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